Glasgow Science Festival hosts pop up restaurants to highlight Scottish Langoustine

 

Scotland’s unsung ‘scampi’ will be the toast of the Glasgow Science Festival this year as we celebrate this delicious indigenous seafood and ask why more people on the continent buy Scottish langoustine than here at home.
As part of Creel to Meal, which is supported as part of Year of Food and Drink Scotland 2015, delivered by VisitScotland and EventScotland, marine biology researchers from the University of Glasgow and the Scottish Creel Fishermen’s Federation will serve up a feast of langoustines, or Nephrops norvegicus, at two exciting pop-up restaurants to encourage more people to seek out, eat and enjoy Scottish seafood.
The curated dinners will take place at the city’s most experimental venues, Stravaigin (Thursday 4th June) and the Drygate Brewery (Thursday 11th June).
At Stravaigin, guests will tuck into four course seafood-themed spectacle of langoustines and the delicious ‘bycatch’ hauled up in the creels - crabs and squat lobsters.
At Drygate, it’ll be ‘posh scampi’ and chips all round with a flight of beers created in the micro-brewery to get the taste buds tingling.
Through the events, project partners Glasgow Science Festival, the University of Glasgow and the Scottish Creel Fishermen’s Federation will share the fascinating journey of this sustainable food source and how these giant shrimp get from West of Scotland waters to our table.
As well as raising awareness of the provenance and value of Scottish langoustine, which was regarded at by-catch forty years ago and is now seen as world-class seafood, the partners will share their latest research developing best practice environmentally sensitive creel fishing methods to help protect this industry into the future.
Creel to Meal builds on a wider, decade long research programme by the University of Glasgow and partners looking into the potential of langoustines to sustain the Scottish fishing industry in the face of dwindling white fish stock.
Creel to Meal will also be a highlight of the Festival’s popular Science Sunday drop in open day, which will be held on campus at the University of Glasgow Hunter Halls and Hunterian Museum on Sunday 14th June. Science Sunday regularly attracts over 7,000 participants.
Creel to Meal is one of a number of food and drink events in this year’s Tasty Science strand, which celebrates the science of food, drink, flavour and innovation.
The events, which are designed to engage the dining audience with aspects of sustainability, ecology and the future of the food and drink sector in Scotland, include two looking at the chemistry of botanicals and gin-making.
Molecular level canapés and delicious cocktails will be the order of the day at Gin-o-Mics with Glasgow Polyomics and Scottish craft producers at The Griffin on Thursday 4th June.
Glasgow Distillery and Glasgow Science Festival will lead a lip-smacking tasting experience at Gin and Botanicals at Siempre Bicycle Café on Friday 5th June.
A picnic in a summer meadow or fish and chips by the seaside? What makes the perfect meal? After working with cutting edge chefs Heston Blumenthal and Ferran Adria, psychologist Professor Charles Spence will dish up the latest on the emerging field of gastrophysics at the University of Glasgow on Sunday 7th June.
For further information about Glasgow Science Festival, visit www.glasgowsciencefestival.org.uk

Scotland’s unsung ‘scampi’ will be the toast of the Glasgow Science Festival this year as we celebrate this delicious indigenous seafood and ask why more people on the continent buy Scottish langoustine than here at home.

As part of Creel to Meal, which is supported as part of Year of Food and Drink Scotland 2015, delivered by VisitScotland and EventScotland, marine biology researchers from the University of Glasgow and the Scottish Creel Fishermen’s Federation will serve up a feast of langoustines, or Nephrops norvegicus, at two exciting pop-up restaurants to encourage more people to seek out, eat and enjoy Scottish seafood.

The curated dinners will take place at the city’s most experimental venues, Stravaigin (Thursday 4th June) and the Drygate Brewery (Thursday 11th June).At Stravaigin, guests will tuck into four course seafood-themed spectacle of langoustines and the delicious ‘bycatch’ hauled up in the creels - crabs and squat lobsters.

At Drygate, it’ll be ‘posh scampi’ and chips all round with a flight of beers created in the micro-brewery to get the taste buds tingling.

Through the events, project partners Glasgow Science Festival, the University of Glasgow and the Scottish Creel Fishermen’s Federation will share the fascinating journey of this sustainable food source and how these giant shrimp get from West of Scotland waters to our table.

As well as raising awareness of the provenance and value of Scottish langoustine, which was regarded at by-catch forty years ago and is now seen as world-class seafood, the partners will share their latest research developing best practice environmentally sensitive creel fishing methods to help protect this industry into the future.

Creel to Meal builds on a wider, decade long research programme by the University of Glasgow and partners looking into the potential of langoustines to sustain the Scottish fishing industry in the face of dwindling white fish stock.

Creel to Meal will also be a highlight of the Festival’s popular Science Sunday drop in open day, which will be held on campus at the University of Glasgow Hunter Halls and Hunterian Museum on Sunday 14th June. Science Sunday regularly attracts over 7,000 participants.

Creel to Meal is one of a number of food and drink events in this year’s Tasty Science strand, which celebrates the science of food, drink, flavour and innovation.

The events, which are designed to engage the dining audience with aspects of sustainability, ecology and the future of the food and drink sector in Scotland, include two looking at the chemistry of botanicals and gin-making.

Molecular level canapés and delicious cocktails will be the order of the day at Gin-o-Mics with Glasgow Polyomics and Scottish craft producers at The Griffin on Thursday 4th June.

Glasgow Distillery and Glasgow Science Festival will lead a lip-smacking tasting experience at Gin and Botanicals at Siempre Bicycle Café on Friday 5th June.

A picnic in a summer meadow or fish and chips by the seaside? What makes the perfect meal? After working with cutting edge chefs Heston Blumenthal and Ferran Adria, psychologist Professor Charles Spence will dish up the latest on the emerging field of gastrophysics at the University of Glasgow on Sunday 7th June.

For further information about Glasgow Science Festival, visit www.glasgowsciencefestival.org.uk

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